Himachal Dental


Tooth Colored Fillings Vs Amalgam Fillings

Posted in Cosmetic Dentistry by UK Dental Tourism on December 21, 2010
Tags: ,

Many of us have received amalgam (silver) fillings, but Dr. Goma’s cosmetic dentistry practice has made noticeable metal fillings a thing of the past. Aside from creating a more appealing smile visually, metal-free fillings may also be better for your health. Despite warnings and scientific proof that metal-free fillings are a better choice than metal amalgam fillings, many patients are not well-informed as to the benefits of metal-free fillings and the risks of metal amalgam fillings.For over 100 years, dentists have been using silver-mercury amalgam fillings to restore decayed or broken teeth.   These materials contain about 50% mercury combined with silver and other metals.  The worked well but they are not only ugly and unnatural in appearance, but they have the potential of creating fractures in the teeth cause by the expansion and contraction of the mercury within the filling.  In the past the only other alternative was gold and that was too expensive for most folks.

For about the last 10 years or so there has been an economical way to beautifully restore teeth in the Shimla area  using tooth-colored resin fillings.  The resin is made up of glass particles in a plastic matrix which is like clay as we mould it and shape its surface.  We bond the putty-like material to the tooth with a high-intensity light.  This hardens the material and allows it to be shaped and polished for immediate use.

Once completed, the tooth has a natural appearance and is actually stronger than before due to the strength of the adhesive agent used to bond the resin to the tooth. Because these fillings bond to the teeth they can remain very small whereas in the past the silver-mercury fillings had to have a large hole drilled to hold the filling in place.  Resin restorations not only look better, but they are stronger and last longer than the old silver-amalgam fillings.

Resin restorations are slightly more costly than the amalgam fillings because of the time and expertise required to place them is much greater.  The benefits of increased natural beauty and safety are worth the difference in price.

Because of its durability, dental amalgam (mercury based) are still widely used in India. With new types of tooth colored fillings, most dentists are gradually phasing out its use.  This is a matter of  personal choice to ensure that our patients are not exposed to unnecessary health risk but is definitely a good news for concerned patients with old amalgam fillings.Please call our Goma Dental office at  177-6450704 to have any questions you may have about the benefits of resin restorations

Advertisements

Form of Mercury in Older Dental Fillings Unlikely to be Toxic

University of Saskatchewan research team found that surface forms of mercury in older “silver” fillings (also known as amalgams) may be less toxic than previously thought. But due to the significant mercury loss over time, human exposure to mercury lost from fillings is “still of concern” and that further research is needed to determine when, how and in what form mercury is lost from fillings.  Despite the fact that their finding is far from conclusive, we still should have our old fillings checked during our routine visits (at least once every 6  months) to our dentist.

Dental Amalgam ( Mercury) Fillings may be less toxic than previously thought.

Amid the on-going controversy over the safety of mercury-containing dental fillings, a University of Saskatchewan research team has shed new light on how the chemical forms of mercury at the surface of fillings change over time.an amalgam filling

Their work, just published in the American Chemical Society journal Chemical Research in Toxicology, shows that the surface forms of mercury in older “silver” fillings (also known as amalgams) may be less toxic than previously thought.

“The dental amalgam on the surface of an old tooth filling may have lost as much as 95 per cent of its mercury but what’s left is in a form that is unlikely to be toxic in the body,” said U of S Canada Research Chair Graham George who led the study.

But the team cautions that due to the significant mercury loss over time, human exposure to mercury lost from fillings is “still of concern” and that further research is needed to determine when, how and in what form mercury is lost from fillings.

Mercury-based fillings have been used by dentists to repair teeth for well over a century. But in recent decades, their use has become controversial due to concerns about exposure to potentially toxic mercury.

“Mercury can potentially exist in several different chemical forms, each with a different toxicity,” said George. “Prior to our work, little was known about how the chemical forms of mercury in dental amalgam might change over time.”

The team used a special X-ray technique at the Stanford Sychrotron Radiation Lightsource to probe the amount and chemical nature of mercury at the surface of both freshly prepared metal fillings and aged fillings (about 20 years old) obtained from the U of S dental clinic’s tooth bank.

While the fresh fillings contained metallic mercury, which can be toxic, aged fillings contained a form of mercury called beta-mercuric sulfide or metacinnabar which is unlikely to be toxic in the body. For this reason, grinding or polishing during dental cleaning is unlikely to cause any toxic effects.

But of potential greater concern is the nature of the surface mercury lost from fillings. This may be due to evaporation (with subsequent inhalation and leaching of mercury into saliva), exposure to some kinds of dental hygiene products such as those containing peroxides, exposure to certain sulphur-containing foods (such as onion and garlic or coffee), or other factors.

“Possibly this missing mercury is in the less toxic form of mercury (metacinnabar) abraded from the surface of the filling. Or alternatively, it may be mercury lost prior to formation of the metacinnabar through various types of exposures,” said George.

Because of its durability, dental amalgam (mercury based) are still widely used in North America and other developed countries. With new types of tooth colored fillings, most dentists are gradually phasing out its use.  This is a matter of  personal choice to ensure that our patients are not exposed to unnecessary health risk but is definitely a good news for concerned patients with old amalgam fillings.


%d bloggers like this: