Himachal Dental


Tooth Colored Fillings Vs Amalgam Fillings

Posted in Cosmetic Dentistry by UK Dental Tourism on December 21, 2010
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Many of us have received amalgam (silver) fillings, but Dr. Goma’s cosmetic dentistry practice has made noticeable metal fillings a thing of the past. Aside from creating a more appealing smile visually, metal-free fillings may also be better for your health. Despite warnings and scientific proof that metal-free fillings are a better choice than metal amalgam fillings, many patients are not well-informed as to the benefits of metal-free fillings and the risks of metal amalgam fillings.For over 100 years, dentists have been using silver-mercury amalgam fillings to restore decayed or broken teeth.   These materials contain about 50% mercury combined with silver and other metals.  The worked well but they are not only ugly and unnatural in appearance, but they have the potential of creating fractures in the teeth cause by the expansion and contraction of the mercury within the filling.  In the past the only other alternative was gold and that was too expensive for most folks.

For about the last 10 years or so there has been an economical way to beautifully restore teeth in the Shimla area  using tooth-colored resin fillings.  The resin is made up of glass particles in a plastic matrix which is like clay as we mould it and shape its surface.  We bond the putty-like material to the tooth with a high-intensity light.  This hardens the material and allows it to be shaped and polished for immediate use.

Once completed, the tooth has a natural appearance and is actually stronger than before due to the strength of the adhesive agent used to bond the resin to the tooth. Because these fillings bond to the teeth they can remain very small whereas in the past the silver-mercury fillings had to have a large hole drilled to hold the filling in place.  Resin restorations not only look better, but they are stronger and last longer than the old silver-amalgam fillings.

Resin restorations are slightly more costly than the amalgam fillings because of the time and expertise required to place them is much greater.  The benefits of increased natural beauty and safety are worth the difference in price.

Because of its durability, dental amalgam (mercury based) are still widely used in India. With new types of tooth colored fillings, most dentists are gradually phasing out its use.  This is a matter of  personal choice to ensure that our patients are not exposed to unnecessary health risk but is definitely a good news for concerned patients with old amalgam fillings.Please call our Goma Dental office at  177-6450704 to have any questions you may have about the benefits of resin restorations

Sedation Dentistry for Nervous Patients In Shimla

Posted in Sedation Dentistry by UK Dental Tourism on December 20, 2010
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Sedation dentistry is the process by which anxious or nervous patients are treated in a relaxed environment to remove the fear that they experience when receiving treatment normally. This involves affecting the central nervous system with drugs, including tranquilisers and anxiolytics. These can be administered to the patient in several ways.

Sedation dentistry is sometimes referred to as sleep dentistry although this doesn’t cover the whole array of techniques at the disposal of the City of Shimla dentist. The medication used to induce the relaxed state does not have to put the patient to sleep but can simply act upon the nervous system to relax the patient and make them feel more comfortable.

Sedation dentistry can be used on any patient who is anxious about receiving any kind of dental treatment, be it cosmetic or restorative. In some cases this can help the patient to overcome their fears once they realise that there is little or no extended pain involved in the dental procedures. Sedation dentistry can also be used on patients who suffer from very sensitive teeth and find normal treatment very painful. It can also be used for patients who have medical conditions such as Parkinson’s disease and Cerebral Palsy.

The three main types of sedation are oral conscious sedation, inhalation sedation and intravenous sedation. Each will be used depending on the conditions and the needs of the patient. The dentist may also use local or general anaesthetic to numb specific areas of the body or mouth.

Sedation dentistry has obvious benefits for patients and dentists alike. It allows them to receive the treatment they need without undergoing what can be a very traumatic experience. For the dentist, it allows them to be able to carry out the treatment without the patient behaving in an anxious manner, which can very often make things more complicated.

Experience The Future Of Dentistry – CEREC

Posted in Dental Technology by UK Dental Tourism on December 18, 2010
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Just as in other fields of healthcare and the wider world, technology is having an incredible effect on the world of dentistry. A new technology called Cerec is revolutionising the way dental treatments are being carried out and offer a glimpse into the future of dentistry.

Cerec utilises CAD/CAM technology, which stands for computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture and is vastly improving both the speed and quality of dental treatment. Cerec technology has been made possible by the development in other areas, such as digital x-rays and three-dimensional imaging. This allows dentists to create an exact image of the patient’s teeth, which they can see instantly on their computer screen. Using this image, they can then design veneers, crowns and inlays that can then be manufactured in a fraction of the time.

The manufacturing process also utilises the incredible powers of computer technology. Whereas in the past a crown would need to be manufactured in the lab by building up layer upon layer of enamel, a Cerec crown can be milled form a single block in as little as six minutes. This incredibly means that you can go into a  dentist’s surgery and have a crown designed, manufactured and installed in the same appointment. For a procedure that could take as long as a month from start to finish in the past, this chair-side surgery represents a huge leap forward.

It is also possible to use Cerec technology to create a whole row of dental veneers that can completely transform a smile. Your  dentist is now using Cerec technology to treat patients. Make an appointment to find out if you can benefit from the new technology.

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Tooth Decay to Be a Thing of the Past?

Posted in Dental News by UK Dental Tourism on December 17, 2010
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The Groningen professors Bauke Dijkstra and Lubbert Dijkhuizen have deciphered the structure and functional mechanism of the glucansucrase enzyme that is responsible for dental plaque sticking to teeth. This knowledge will stimulate the identification of substances that inhibit the enzyme. Just add that substance to toothpaste, or even sweets, and caries will be a thing of the past.

The results of the research have been published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

The University of Groningen researchers analysed glucansucrase from the lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus reuteri, which is present in the human mouth and digestive tract. The bacteria use the glucansucrase enzyme to convert sugar from food into long, sticky sugar chains. They use this glue to attach themselves to tooth enamel. The main cause of tooth decay, the bacterium Streptococcus mutans, also uses this enzyme. Once attached to tooth enamel, these bacteria ferment sugars releasing acids that dissolve the calcium in teeth. This is how caries develops.

Three dimensional structure

Using protein crystallography, the researchers were able to elucidate the three dimensional (3D) structure of the enzyme. The Groningen researchers are the first to succeed in crystallizing glucansucrase. The crystal structure has revealed that the folding mechanism of the protein is unique. The various domains of the enzyme are not formed from a single, linear amino acid chain but from two parts that assemble via a U-shaped structure of the chain; this is the first report on such a folding mechanism in the literature.

Functional mechanism

The unravelling of the 3D structure provided the researchers with detailed insight into the functional mechanism of the enzyme. The enzyme splits sucrose into fructose and glucose and then adds the glucose molecule to a growing sugar chain. Thus far the scientific community assumed that both processes were performed by different parts of the enzyme. However, the model created by the Groningen researchers has revealed that both activities occur in the same active site of the enzyme.

Inhibitors

Dijkhuizen expects that specific inhibitors for the glucansucrase enzyme may help to prevent attachment of the bacteria to the tooth enamel. Information about the structure and functional mechanism of the enzyme is crucial for developing such inhibitors. Thus far, such research has not been successful, states Dijkhuizen: ‘The various inhibitors studied not only blocked the glucansucrase, but also the digestive enzyme amylase in our saliva, which is needed to degrade starch.’

Evolution

The crystal structure also provides an explanation for this double inhibition. The data published by the Groningen scientists shows that glucansucrase proteins most likely evolved from amylase enzymes that degrade starch. ‘We already knew that the two enzymes were similar’, says Dijkhuizen, ‘but the crystal structure revealed that the active sites are virtually identical. Future inhibitors thus need to be directed towards very specific targets because both enzymes are evolutionary closely related.’

Toothpaste and sweets

Dijkhuizen points out that in future glucansucrase inhibitors may be added to toothpaste and mouthwash. ‘But it may even be possible to add them to sweets’, he suggests. ‘An inhibitor might prevent that sugars released in the mouth cause damage.’ However, Dijkhuizen doesn’t expect that toothbrushes have had their day: ‘it will always be necessary to clean your teeth.’ ScienceDaily (Dec. 4, 2010)


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